Under international law, a ceasefire is a legal agreement (often in a document) that puts an end to fighting between the “belligerents” of war or conflict. [2] In the Hague Convention of 1899, in which three treaties were concluded and three declarations were made, the Convention on the Laws and Customs of War in Rural Areas established that “if the duration of the ceasefire is not fixed”, the parties can resume fighting (Article 36) at their convenience, but with correct communications. It is a “fixed-term” ceasefire, where the parties can only renew the fighting at the end of their fixed duration. If the belligerents say (in fact) “this ceasefire puts a complete end to the fighting” without a ceasefire deadline, then the duration of the ceasefire is set in the sense that no resumption of fighting is allowed at any time. Thus, the Korean ceasefire agreement calls for a “ceasefire and ceasefire” and aims to “achieve a ceasefire that guarantees a complete cessation of hostilities and all armed acts in Korea until a definitive peaceful solution is found. [3] On 1 January 1949, a UNITED Nations-brokered ceasefire was concluded between India and Pakistan, ending the 1947 Indo-Pakistan War (also known as the 1947 Kashmir War). In October 1947, fighting broke out in Kashmir between the two newly independent countries, with India intervening on behalf of the princely ruler of Kashmir, who joined India, and Pakistan, which supported the rebels. Fighting was limited to Kashmir, but as India feared it would turn to a global international war, India referred the matter to the UN Security Council, in accordance with Article 35 of the UN Charter, which deals with situations “likely to threaten the maintenance of international peace.” The Security Council established the United Nations Special Commission for India and Pakistan, which acted as a mediator for a year during which the fighting continued. Following several UN resolutions establishing a referendum settlement procedure, a ceasefire agreement was reached in late December 1948 between the countries, which came into force last year. The Security Council has established the United Nations Military Observer Group on India and Pakistan (UNMOGIP) to monitor the ceasefire line. [17] In 2018, India declared a ceasefire in the Kashmir Valley during Ramadan. [18] In modern conflicts, the UN Security Council often imposes ceasefire resolutions or attempts to force them.

The armistice is always negotiated between the parties themselves and is therefore generally considered more binding than non-binding UN ceasefire resolutions in modern international law. A ceasefire (or ceasefire) that has also concluded a ceasefire (the anonymity of “open fire” [1]) is the temporary end of a war in which each side agrees with the other side to suspend aggressive actions. [2] Historically, the concept existed at least in medieval times, when it was known as the “peace of God.” [3] Ceasefires may be declared as a humanitarian gesture[4] provisionally, i.e. before a political agreement, or definitively, i.e. for the purpose of resolving a conflict. [5] Ceasefires can be declared as part of a formal treaty, but they have also been described as an informal agreement between opposing forces. [1] On January 15, 1973, U.S. President Richard Nixon ordered a ceasefire for airstrikes in northern Vietnam.

The decision was made after the return of Henry Kissinger, Presidential National Security Adviser, with a draft peace proposal from Paris to Washington, D.C. Combat operations continued in southern Vietnam. On January 27, 1973, all parties to the Vietnam War signed a ceasefire, a prelude to the Paris peace agreement.